top of page

Day 15 of Our 31 Day Series of How Medicine Got It Wrong

To Shed or Not to Shed, That is The Question


Viral shedding refers to the process by which a person who has been infected with a virus releases the virus into the environment, potentially infecting others. Vaccines, which contain weakened or inactivated forms of a virus, can also lead to viral shedding in some cases. Here is a brief history of viral shedding from vaccines, along with some examples:

  1. Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV): OPV is a live, attenuated vaccine that was first developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1950s. While it has been highly effective in eradicating polio, it can also lead to viral shedding. This means that people who have received the vaccine can sometimes shed the virus in their stool, which can then infect others who come into contact with it.

  2. Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine: The MMR vaccine is a live, attenuated vaccine that was first licensed in the United States in 1971. Like OPV, it can also lead to viral shedding in some cases. However, the risk of shedding is much lower with the MMR vaccine than with OPV.

  3. Rotavirus Vaccine: Rotavirus is a common cause of severe diarrhea in young children. Two vaccines against rotavirus, RotaTeq and Rotarix, were licensed in the United States in 2006. Both vaccines are live, attenuated vaccines and can lead to viral shedding in some cases.

Researchers in Japan learned that Omicron RNA detection of SARS-CoV-2 virus after vaccination with mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) was highest 2-5 days after diagnosis or after symptom onset and then decreased over time, markedly 10 days after diagnosis or symptom onset. The study findings suggest” the possibility of changes in the viral replication kinetics, unlike previous reports of ancestral (wild-type) strains.“


Watch the Video On One of Our Channels


References

  1. Sabin, Albert. "Attenuated Poliovirus Vaccines." US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6 Jan. 2016, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772905/ .

  2. "Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Feb. 2021, http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mmr/public/index.html .

  3. "Rotavirus Vaccines." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 Mar. 2021, http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaccines/rotavirus-vaccine.html .

  4. Chandrashekar, Abishek, et al. "SARS-CoV-2 Infection, Vaccination, and Viral Shedding." Cell, vol. 184, no. 13, 2021, pp. 3470-3472.e6., doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2021.05.018.


368 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page